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J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 1998 Mar;27(3):213-8.

Craniosacral rhythm: reliability and relationships with cardiac and respiratory rates.

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1
Texas Woman's University, Houston 77030, USA.

Abstract

Craniosacral rhythm (CSR) has long been the subject of debate, both over its existence and its use as a therapeutic tool in evaluation and treatment. Origins of this rhythm are unknown, and palpatory findings lack scientific support. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of the palpation of the rate of the CSR and the relationship between the rate of the CSR and the heart or respiratory rates of subjects and examiners. The rates of the CSR of 40 healthy adults were palpated twice by each of two examiners. The heart and respiratory rates of the examiners and the subjects were recorded while the rates of the subjects' CSR were palpated by the examiners. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities of the palpation. Two multiple regression analyses, one for each examiner, were conducted to analyze the relationships between the rate of the CSR and the heart and respiratory rates of the subjects and the examiners. The intraexaminer reliability coefficients were 0.78 for examiner A and 0.83 for examiner B, and the interexaminer reliability coefficient was 0.22. The result of the multiple regression analysis for examiner A was R = 0.46 and adjusted R2 = 0.12 (p = 0.078) and for examiner B was R = 0.63 and adjusted R2 = 0.32 (p = 0.001). The highest bivariate correlation was found between the CSR and the subject's heart rate (r = 0.30) for examiner A and between the CSR and the examiner's heart rate (r = 0.42) for examiner B. The results indicated that a single examiner may be able to palpate the rate of the CSR consistently, if that is what we truly measured. It is possible that the perception of CSR is illusory. The rate of the CSR palpated by two examiners is not consistent. The results of the regression analysis of one examiner offered no validation to those of the other. It appears that a subject's CSR is not related to the heart or respiratory rates of the subject or the examiner.

PMID:
9513867
DOI:
10.2519/jospt.1998.27.3.213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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