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Biochem J. 1998 Apr 1;331 ( Pt 1):1-14.

Transcriptional control and the role of silencers in transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes.

Author information

1
Queensland Cancer Fund Experimental Oncology Program, The Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, 4029 Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

Mechanisms controlling transcription and its regulation are fundamental to our understanding of molecular biology and, ultimately, cellular biology. Our knowledge of transcription initiation and integral factors such as RNA polymerase is considerable, and more recently our understanding of the involvement of enhancers and complexes such as holoenzyme and mediator has increased dramatically. However, an understanding of transcriptional repression is also essential for a complete understanding of promoter structure and the regulation of gene expression. Transcriptional repression in eukaryotes is achieved through 'silencers', of which there are two types, namely 'silencer elements' and 'negative regulatory elements' (NREs). Silencer elements are classical, position-independent elements that direct an active repression mechanism, and NREs are position-dependent elements that direct a passive repression mechanism. In addition, 'repressors' are DNA-binding trasncription factors that interact directly with silencers. A review of the recent literature reveals that it is the silencer itself and its context within a given promoter, rather than the interacting repressor, that determines the mechanism of repression. Silencers form an intrinsic part of many eukaryotic promoters and, consequently, knowledge of their interactive role with enchancers and other transcriptional elements is essential for our understanding of gene regulation in eukaryotes.

PMID:
9512455
PMCID:
PMC1219314
DOI:
10.1042/bj3310001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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