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Acad Emerg Med. 1998 Feb;5(2):94-9.

Prospective, randomized, controlled trial of tissue adhesive (2-octylcyanoacrylate) vs standard wound closure techniques for laceration repair. Stony Brook Octylcyanoacrylate Study Group.

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1
Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, University Medical Center, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare a new tissue adhesive, 2-octylcyanoacrylate, with standard wound closure techniques for the repair of traumatic lacerations.

METHODS:

A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial enrolled consecutive patients > 1 year of age with non-bite, non-crush-induced lacerations who presented < 6 hours after injury. Structured closed-question data sheets were completed at the time of laceration repair and suture removal. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment with either 2-octylcyanoacrylate or standard wound closure. Infection was determined at the time of suture removal. Long-term cosmetic appearance (> 3 months) was assessed by physicians using a previously validated categorical cosmetic scale and by patients using a 100-mm visual analog scale.

RESULTS:

There were 63 patients randomized to the octylcyanoacrylate group and 61 patients treated with standard wound closure techniques. The 2 treatment groups were similar with respect to age, gender, race, medical history, and wound characteristics. At the 5-to-10-day follow-up, only 1 wound was infected and only 2 wounds required reclosure due to dehiscence. These 3 patients received treatment with octylcyanoacrylate. At long-term follow-up, the cosmetic appearances were similar according to the patients (octylcyanoacrylate, 83.8 +/- 19.4 mm vs standard techniques, 82.5 +/- 17.6 mm; p = 0.72) and the physicians (optimal cosmetic appearance, 77% vs 80%; p = 0.67).

CONCLUSIONS:

Wounds treated with octylcyanoacrylate and standard wound closure techniques have similar cosmetic appearances 3 months later.

PMID:
9492126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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