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Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 1997 Dec;35(6):424-8.

Survival of patients who needed salvage surgery for recurrence after radiotherapy for oral carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and Oral Surgery, Royal Gwent Hospital, Glan Hafren NHS Trust, Newport, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To find out how long patients with oral carcinoma survived after the primary tumour had been treated by radiotherapy and who required salvage surgery for recurrence; to see if there were any significant differences in age, sex, site, size, and histology of the tumours in relation to survival; and to see if the time of the recurrence had any effect on the survival.

DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis of case notes.

SETTING:

Teaching Hospital Scotland.

SUBJECTS:

370 consecutive patients, 187 (51%) of whom were initially treated by radiotherapy; 58 of the 187 (31%) developed a recurrence that was considered suitable for salvage surgery.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

43/58 patients had died and 15 patients were still alive at the time of the study, the median (range) survival of the group was 21 (6-89) months compared with 72 (19-212) months, respectively (P = 0.0001). Other significant difference included age at presentation for men (P = 0.004), and the increased likelihood of survival if the initial site of the tumour was the tongue (P = 0.02). There was also a highly significant correlation between time to recurrence and survival amongst those who died (P = 0.002). A short recurrence time may suggest a less radical surgical salvage option if reduced survival is likely. Why there should be such an association is unknown.

PMID:
9486449
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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