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Biochemistry. 1998 Feb 24;37(8):2305-13.

Epitope insertion favors a six transmembrane domain model for the carboxy-terminal portion of the multidrug resistance-associated protein.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Drummond, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6.

Abstract

The overexpression of the multidrug resistance protein, MRP, in mammalian cells is associated with pleiotropic resistance to cytotoxic drugs. MRP is an integral membrane protein which belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette transporters. Secondary structure predictions combined with biochemical analyses suggest that MRP encodes 11 transmembrane (TM) domains in the amino-terminal half of the protein and four or six transmembrane domains in the carboxy-terminal half of the protein. To gain insight into the membrane topology of the carboxy-terminal half of MRP, small, antigenic hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes (YPYDVPDYAS) were inserted within six predicted hydrophilic subfragments of this region (938, 1001, 1084, 1175, 1222, 1295). These epitope-tagged MRP variants were expressed in HeLa cells to evaluate their ability to confer resistance to the drug etoposide (VP-16). Insertion of the HA epitopes at positions 938, 1001, and 1222 resulted in functional proteins, while epitope insertion at positions 1084, 1175, and 1295 abrogated MRP function. The intracellular versus extracellular location of the HA epitopes present in biologically active MRP variants was then established in intact and permeabilized cells by immunofluorescence using an anti-HA antibody. Epitopes inserted at positions 1001 and 1222 were located on the extracellular side of the plasma membrane, while the epitope inserted at position 938 was located intracellularly. These results are consistent with a six TM rather than a four TM domain model for the membrane portion of the carboxy-terminal half of MRP.

PMID:
9485377
DOI:
10.1021/bi972332v
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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