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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1998 Jan;22(1):1-6.

Determinants of weight maintenance in women after diet-induced weight reduction.

Author information

1
Open University, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Assessment of determinants for relatively successful weight maintenance in women after diet-induced weight reduction.

DESIGN:

Subjects followed two weight cycles over two years, each cycle starting with a Very Low Energy Diet (VLED) (2.8 MJ/d), in a free-living situation. They completed the Herman Polivy Restraint Questionnaire and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire twice, that is, before and during the first VLED.

SUBJECTS:

Twenty seven obese women, body mass index (BMI) (28-38 kg/m2), age (19-53 y), being premenopausal and healthy, participated twice in the energy restriction periods with one year follow-up.

MEASUREMENTS:

Weight and body composition were measured at weeks 0, 8, 60, 68 and 120 after the start of the first VLED. Scores on the restraint scales before and during the first VLED were analysed. Percentages regain after one year and after two years follow-up were related to these scores.

RESULTS:

Three groups appeared with respect to success regarding weight maintenance. Group 1 (successful): twice a regain < 50% of weight loss; group 2 (partly successful): once a regain < 50% of weight loss and group 3 (unsuccessful): twice a regain of > 50% of weight loss. Percentage regain was negatively correlated to an increase in cognitive restrained eating behaviour (r = 0.8; P = 0.0001). A change in attitude with respect to food intake, expressed as an increase in cognitive restraint, and as a positive relationship between cognitive restraint and disinhibition was related to successful weight maintenance.

CONCLUSION:

An increase in cognitive restraint from before, to during, the diet, and a positive correlation between cognitive restraint and disinhibition, are two determinants representing eating behaviour for successful weight maintenance.

PMID:
9481593
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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