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J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 1998 Jan-Feb;27(1):47-53.

A nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention during pregnancy.

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1
Ohio State University Hospital Clinics, Columbus, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention in an outpatient setting among pregnant women who smoked.

DESIGN:

Prospective; control group participants' cessation rates were assessed 6-12 weeks after clinic contact. They were compared to cessation rates for subsequent intervention participants 6-12 weeks after receiving a nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred seventy-eight women who were daily smokers, during their first visit after confirmation of pregnancy at a teaching hospital prenatal clinic.

INTERVENTION:

Fifteen-minute individualized intervention delivered by an advanced-practice nurse, combined with a telephone contact by an advanced-practice nurse 7-10 days after the clinic visit.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-report of smoking, confirmed by saliva cotinine.

RESULTS:

Intervention group participants had a self-reported abstinence rate of 19% compared with 0% among control group participants. The cotinine-validated abstinence rate for the intervention group was 15.5%, compared with 0% in the control group. African Americans were more likely to quit, compared with white participants who received the intervention.

CONCLUSION:

A nurse-managed intervention combined with a telephone contact may be an effective strategy for intervening with pregnant smokers, especially African Americans.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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