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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Jan;178(1 Pt 1):150-5.

Effects of nomegestrol acetate on spontaneous and sulprostone-induced uterine contractions in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys monitored by telemetry.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris VI, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our purpose was to study the effects of the progestomimetic compound nomegestrol acetate on spontaneous and sulprostone-induced uterine contractility in pregnant cynomolgus monkeys.

STUDY DESIGN:

Intrauterine pressure was continuously monitored with use of an implanted intraamniotic catheter and a telemetric pressure transmitter from day 115 to 135 of gestation (term = 165 days). After surgery the animals received either nomegestrol acetate (5 mg per day orally, n = 3) or vehicle only (controls, n = 3). The intramuscular prostaglandin E2 analog sulprostone (25 micrograms) was administered as a single injection 10 days after amniotic catheter implantation. Spontaneous and sulprostone-induced uterine contractions were compared between nomegestrol acetate- and vehicle-treated animals.

RESULTS:

The frequency of spontaneous uterine contractions in control animals demonstrated a 24-hour pattern with a minimum at 12 hours and a maximum at 0 hours. The frequency of spontaneous contractions did not differ between nomegestrol acetate- and vehicle-treated animals. Sulprostone induced an increase in both the frequency and amplitude of contractions, reaching a maximum 12 hours after injection and fading out after 24 hours in vehicle-treated animals. In animals receiving nomegestrol acetate, the frequency of contractions increased moderately and transiently for a total duration of 6 hours only and returned to control levels thereafter.

CONCLUSION:

Nomegestrol acetate significantly decreases the contractile response of the pregnant uterus induced by the prostaglandin E2 analog sulprostone.

PMID:
9465820
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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