Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Virology. 1998 Feb 1;241(1):122-30.

Interaction between the herpes simplex virus type 1 origin-binding and DNA polymerase accessory proteins.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Ohio State University, 333 West Tenth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA.

Abstract

Interactions between the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) origin (ori)-binding protein (UL9) and two other components of the functional DNA replication complex have been observed. However, to date, no interaction between UL9 and a component of the DNA polymerase holoenzyme has been demonstrated. In this report, we demonstrate that UL9 and the DNA polymerase accessory protein (UL42) can form a stable complex in vitro as determined by coimmunoprecipitation with specific antibodies to each protein and by affinity chromatography using glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins. Complex formation does not require the presence of other viral proteins and occurs in the presence of ethidium bromide, indicating that UL9-UL42 interaction is DNA independent. Affinity beads charged with increasing concentrations of GST-42 fusion protein up to 5 microM bound increasing amounts of UL9 expressed by in vitro transcription/translation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Binding of N- and C-terminal portions of UL9 to GST affinity matrices revealed that the N-terminal 533 amino acids were sufficient for binding to GST-42, albeit at approximately a four- to six-fold reduced affinity compared to the full-length protein. No binding of a polypeptide containing the remainder of the UL9 C-terminal residues was observed. Thus the ori-binding protein, UL9, can physically associate with at least one member of each of the complexes (helicase/primase, DNA polymerase holoenzyme, single-stranded DNA-binding protein) required for origin-dependent DNA replication. These specific interactions provide a means by which the ordered assembly of HSV-1 DNA replication proteins at origins of replication can occur in the infected cell for initiation of viral DNA synthesis.

PMID:
9454723
DOI:
10.1006/viro.1997.8953
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center