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Circulation. 1998 Jan 20;97(2):155-60.

Family history as a risk factor for primary cardiac arrest.

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1
Department of Social Medicine, The Hebrew University-Hadassah School of Public Health, Jerusalem, Israel. yfried@vms.huji.ac.il

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The hypothesis that a family history of myocardial infarction (MI) or primary cardiac arrest (PCA) is an independent risk factor for primary cardiac arrest was examined in a population-based case-control study. In addition, we investigated whether recognized risk factors account for the familial aggregation of these cardiovascular events.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

PCA cases, 25 to 74 years old, attended by paramedics during the period 1988 to 1994 and population-based control subjects matched for age and sex were identified from the community by random digit dialing. All subjects were free of recognized clinical heart disease and major comorbidity. A detailed history of MI and PCA in first-degree relatives was collected in interviews with the spouses of case and control subjects by trained interviewers using a standardized questionnaire. For each familial relationship, there was a higher rate of MI or primary cardiac arrest (MI/PCA) in relatives of case compared with relatives of control subjects. Overall, the rate of MI/PCA among first-degree relatives of cardiac arrest patients was almost 50% higher than that in first-degree relatives of control subjects (rate ratio [RR]=1.46; 95% CI=1.23 to 1.72). In a multivariate logistic model, family history of MI/PCA was associated with PCA (RR=1.57; 95% CI=1.27 to 1.95) even after adjustment for other common risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Family history of MI or PCA is positively associated with the risk of primary cardiac arrest. This association is mostly independent of familial aggregation of other common risk factors.

PMID:
9445167
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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