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Eur J Biochem. 1997 Nov 15;250(1):122-9.

Extraction of Hoechst 33342 from the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane by P-glycoprotein.

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1
The British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

P-glycoprotein is an ATP-dependent plasma membrane multidrug transporter of broad specificity. A common chemical property of its substrates is that all are lipophilic. Using Hoechst 33342 as the substrate, we have previously shown that P-glycoprotein extracts the substrate directly from the lipid bilayer [Shapiro, A. B., Corder, A. B. & Ling, V. (1997) Eur. J. Biochem. 250, 115-121]. In this paper, we determined the leaflet of the plasma membrane from which P-glycoprotein extracts Hoechst 33342. The initial rate of Hoechst 33342 transport upon ATP addition to P-glycoprotein-rich inside-out plasma membrane vesicles decreased slightly with the amount of time previously elapsed for slow diffusion of Hoechst 33342 to the extracellular leaflet. This result is consistent with transport from the cytoplasmic leaflet. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer from donor Hoechst 33342 to acceptor 2-[6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]hexanoyl-sn-glycero- 3-phosphocholine (Nbd-C6-HPC) in the cytoplasmic leaflet was used to monitor the amount of Hoechst 33342 in the cytoplasmic leaflet versus time. The initial rate of decrease of the energy-transfer-related Nbd-C6-HPC fluorescence after ATP addition exceeded that of the Hoechst 33342 fluorescence and continued to decrease after decrease of the Hoechst 33342 fluorescence had ceased. These effects were consistent with transport of Hoechst 33342 from the cytoplasmic leaflet to the aqueous interior of the vesicles, followed by rebinding to the extracellular leaflet. This demonstrates that P-glycoprotein transports drugs from the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane directly to the aqueous extracellular medium. This finding has implications for efforts to localize the drug-binding site(s) within P-glycoprotein.

PMID:
9431999
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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