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J Clin Invest. 1997 Nov 1;100(9):2315-24.

Changes in gene expression in the intact human heart. Downregulation of alpha-myosin heavy chain in hypertrophied, failing ventricular myocardium.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver 80262, USA.

Abstract

Using quantitative RT-PCR in RNA from right ventricular (RV) endomyocardial biopsies from intact nonfailing hearts, and subjects with moderate RV failure from primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), we measured expression of genes involved in regulation of contractility or hypertrophy. Gene expression was also assessed in LV (left ventricular) and RV free wall and RV endomyocardium of hearts from end-stage IDC subjects undergoing heart transplantation or from nonfailing donors. In intact failing hearts, downregulation of beta1-receptor mRNA and protein, upregulation of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA expression, and increased myocyte diameter indicated similar degrees of failure and hypertrophy in the IDC and PPH phenotypes. The only molecular phenotypic difference between PPH and IDC RVs was upregulation of beta2-receptor gene expression in PPH but not IDC. The major new findings were that (a) both nonfailing intact and explanted human ventricular myocardium expressed substantial amounts of alpha-myosin heavy chain mRNA (alpha-MHC, 23-34% of total), and (b) in heart failure alpha-MHC was downregulated (by 67-84%) and beta-MHC gene expression was upregulated. We conclude that at the mRNA level nonfailing human heart expresses substantial alpha-MHC. In myocardial failure this alteration in gene expression of MHC isoforms, if translated into protein expression, would decrease myosin ATPase enzyme velocity and slow speed of contraction.

PMID:
9410910
PMCID:
PMC508428
DOI:
10.1172/JCI119770
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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