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J Hepatol. 1997 Nov;27(5):817-23.

Splanchnic and extrasplanchnic arterial hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine II, Kurume University School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

This study was designed to assess the contribution of splanchnic and extrasplanchnic vascular hemodynamics to the hyperdynamic circulation in patients with cirrhosis.

METHODS:

Cardiac index and flow volume index and pulsatility index (PI) of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and femoral artery (FA) were measured with Doppler ultrasonography in 40 controls and 86 patients with cirrhosis (Child-Pugh grade A=41, grade B=30, and grade C=15). Mean arterial pressure was also recorded to calculate systemic vascular resistance index.

RESULTS:

Systemic vascular resistance index was significantly lower in each Child-Pugh group than in controls. SMA blood flow index was significantly higher in each Child-Pugh group than in controls and the increase in SMA blood flow index paralleled the degree of liver dysfunction. SMA-PI was significantly lower in each Child-Pugh group than in controls and the decrease in SMA-PI paralleled the degree of liver dysfunction. FA blood flow index was slightly higher in Child-Pugh grade A patients and significantly higher in grade B patients than in controls, whereas grade C patients had normal FA blood flow index. FA-PI was significantly lower in grade A and grade B patients than in controls, whereas grade C patients had normal FA-PI. When all patients were examined together, SMA-PI significantly correlated with systemic vascular resistance index (r=0.69, p<0.01). In contrast, FA-PI did not significantly correlate with systemic vascular resistance index (r=0.15, p=0.18).

CONCLUSIONS:

Splanchnic arterial vasodilatation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of decreased systemic vascular resistance seen in patients with cirrhosis.

PMID:
9382968
DOI:
10.1016/s0168-8278(97)80318-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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