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Oncol Nurs Forum. 1997 Sep;24(8):1419-22.

A nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention during diagnostic testing for lung cancer.

Author information

1
Ohio State University College of Nursing, Columbus, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To determine the effectiveness of a nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention.

DESIGN:

Prospective, descriptive, one-group, pretest/post-test.

SETTING:

Urban, academic, tertiary-care setting.

SAMPLE:

Fifteen adult male and female smokers with a suspected diagnosis of lung cancer who were admitted to an inpatient thoracic surgery unit for diagnostic testing.

METHODS:

Subjects received a nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention during hospitalization with subsequent verification of smoking status at a clinic visit six weeks postintervention.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Self-reported smoking status and saliva cotinine levels at six weeks postintervention.

FINDINGS:

Eighty-seven percent of subjects reported an intent to quit smoking within the month. At six weeks postintervention, 93% of the subjects reported at least one cessation attempt, and 40% were confirmed, via saliva cotinine analysis, as abstinent from smoking during the prior week.

CONCLUSIONS:

A nurse-managed smoking cessation intervention was successful in achieving short-term cessation.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE:

Hospitalization for diagnostic testing associated with lung cancer may represent an opportunity for nurses to deliver a smoking-cessation intervention.

PMID:
9380597
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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