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J Vasc Surg. 1997 Nov;26(5):817-22.

Experimental repair of venous valvular insufficiency using a cryopreserved venous valve allograft aided by a distal arteriovenous fistula.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis 46202, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the patency and hemodynamic impact of a cryopreserved allograft venous valve transplanted to the superficial femoral vein (SFV) of a canine insufficiency model aided by a distal arteriovenous fistula (dAVF).

METHODS:

Eight greyhounds had intravenous hemodynamic parameters measured (venous filling time [VFT], 90% of venous refilling time [VRT90], and simulated ambulatory venous pressure [AVP]) before (T0) and after complete hindlimb venous valvulotomy (T1) to produce venous insufficiency. Simultaneously, a valve-containing vein segment was harvested from the opposite SFV or external jugular vein (n = 1) and cryopreserved. Three weeks later a blood type-matched cryopreserved valve was transplanted to the insufficient SFV aided by a low-flow (n = 4) or high-flow (n = 4) dAVF. The fistula was ligated in 3 to 6 weeks, and venous indexes (T2) were obtained 3 weeks later. Analysis of variances compared the venous indexes at T0, T1, and T2 for statistical significance. Gross and histologic inspection assessed valve integrity.

RESULTS:

Two valves aided by a low-flow dAVF exhibited thrombosis and scarring. The hemodynamics of the six remaining valves demonstrated normalization of the VRT90, an AVP consistent with insufficiency, and a VFT between normal and total venous insufficiency. The patent valves were normal on gross examination and by histologic examination with signs of normal external healing.

CONCLUSIONS:

A cryopreserved venous valve allograft transplanted to the SFV of an incompetent hindlimb partially corrects venous hemodynamics. A high-flow arteriovenous fistula most consistently preserves transplant patency.

PMID:
9372820
DOI:
10.1016/s0741-5214(97)70095-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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