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AIDS. 1997 Nov;11(13):1603-10.

Potential efficacy of fumagillin in intestinal microsporidiosis due to Enterocytozoon bieneusi in patients with HIV infection: results of a drug screening study. The French Microsporidiosis Study Group.

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1
Hôpitaux de Paris, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Intestinal microsporidiosis due to Enterocytozoon bieneusi is a frequent cause of chronic diarrhoea in patients with HIV infection for which there is no available therapy. This study was designed to search for a drug with activity against this organism.

DESIGN:

Prospective open-labelled Phase II multicentre study.

SETTING:

University hospitals.

PATIENTS:

Sixty HIV-infected men with intestinal E. bieneusi infection.

INTERVENTIONS:

Ten drug regimens were consecutively tested orally for 3 weeks: albendazole plus metronidazole, sulphadiazine plus pyrimethamine, atovaquone, doxycycline plus nifuroxazide, itraconazole, flubendazole, chloroquine, paromomycin, sparfloxacin and fumagillin. Nine evaluable patients per regimen were required, but each patient could be enrolled up to three times in the study.

OUTCOME MEASURE:

Efficacy was assessed primarily by the clearance of E. bieneusi from stools and intestinal biopsies. The safety of each regimen was also assessed.

RESULTS:

Only purified fumagillin was able to clear E. bieneusi from stools as well as intestinal biopsies, whereas all other regimens failed to show antiparasitic efficacy. However, only four patients received fumagillin because of drug-induced thrombocytopenia. The four patients who received fumagillin remained free of E. bieneusi infection after a mean follow-up of 10 months.

CONCLUSION:

Eradication of E. bieneusi from the intestinal tract of patients with HIV infection and persistent immunosuppression is an achievable goal. Our study allowed the identification of oral fumagillin as a potential treatment for intestinal microsporidiosis due to E. bieneusi.

PMID:
9365765
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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