Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 15;30(6):1527-33.

Doppler tissue imaging: a noninvasive technique for evaluation of left ventricular relaxation and estimation of filling pressures.

Author information

  • 1Baylor College of Medicine and Department of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. sherifn@bcm.tmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This investigation was designed 1) to assess whether the early diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus (Ea) obtained with Doppler tissue imaging (DTI) behaves as a preload-independent index of left ventricular (LV) relaxation; and 2) to evaluate the relation of the mitral E/Ea ratio to LV filling pressures.

BACKGROUND:

Recent observations suggest that Ea is an index of LV relaxation that is less influenced by LV filling pressures.

METHODS:

One hundred twenty-five study subjects were classified into three groups according to mitral E/A ratio, LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and clinical symptoms: 34 asymptomatic subjects with a normal LVEF and an E/A ratio > or =1; 40 with a normal LVEF, an E/A ratio <1 and no heart failure symptoms (impaired relaxation [IR]); and 51 with heart failure symptoms and an E/A ratio >1 (pseudonormal [PN]). Ea was derived from the lateral border of the annulus. A subset of 60 patients had invasive measurement of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) simultaneous with Doppler echocardiographic DTI.

RESULTS:

Ea was reduced in the IR and PN groups compared with the group of normal subjects: 5.8 +/- 1.5 and 5.2 +/- 1.4 vs. 12 +/- 2.8 cm/s, respectively (p < 0.001). Mean PCWP (20 +/- 8 mm Hg) related weakly to mitral E (r = 0.68) but not to Ea. The E/Ea ratio related well to PCWP (r = 0.87; PCWP = 1.24 [E/Ea] + 1.9), with a difference between Doppler and catheter measurements of 0.1 +/- 3.8 mm Hg.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ea behaves as a preload-independent index of LV relaxation. Mitral E velocity, corrected for the influence of relaxation (i.e., the E/Ea ratio), relates well to mean PCWP and may be used to estimate LV filling pressures.

PMID:
9362412
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center