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Am J Public Health. 1997 Oct;87(10):1705-9.

'Call fast, Call 911': a direct mail campaign to reduce patient delay in acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Center for Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services, Seattle-King County Department of Public Health, Wash. 98104-4039, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A 10-month direct mail campaign was implemented to increase use of emergency medical services via 911 calls and to reduce prehospital delay for individuals experiencing acute myocardial infarction symptoms.

METHODS:

This prospective, randomized, controlled trial involved three intervention groups (receiving brochures with informational, emotional, or social messages) and a control group.

RESULTS:

Intervention effects were not observed except for individuals who had a history of acute myocardial infarction and who were discharged with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; their 911 use was meaningfully higher in each intervention group than in the control group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The mailings affected only the individuals at greatest risk.

PMID:
9357360
PMCID:
PMC1381141
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.87.10.1705
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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