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Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Oct;51(10):708-12.

Using cross-check questions to address the problem of mis-reporting of specific food groups on Food Frequency Questionnaires. UKWCS Steering Group. United Kingdom Women's Cohort Study Steering Group.

Author information

1
Division of Public Health, Nuffield Institute for Health, University of Leeds.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the potential mis-reporting of specific food groups from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) data and to examine the effect of using a weighting factor on estimated nutrient intake and ranking of subjects within the cohort according to nutrient intake.

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS:

A weighting factor was calculated for each of the individual 6572 women aged 35-69 y for four food groups, fish, meat, vegetables and fruit, using FFQ data and cross-check responses.

RESULTS:

The vegetables weighting had most effect on median intakes, particularly of fibre, vitamins A, C and E and folate. When all the weightings were applied, the median intakes of vitamins A and E were reduced by 35% and 27% respectively and the vitamin C intake was reduced by 44%. Ranking of subjects within the cohort according to nutrient intake was barely affected by the fish and meat weightings. The vegetable weighting had most effect on vitamin A with a rank correlation coefficient of 0.88. When all the weightings were applied the rank correlations for vitamins A, C and E and folate were all less than 0.90.

CONCLUSION:

Inclusion of cross-check questions in FFQs can provide an additional source of information on food group intake. This can be compared with FFQ data to help identify possible over-reporting and then to adjust frequency of intake accordingly.

PMID:
9347293
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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