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Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997 Oct;51(10):682-90.

Supplementation with wine phenolic compounds increases the antioxidant capacity of plasma and vitamin E of low-density lipoprotein without changing the lipoprotein Cu(2+)-oxidizability: possible explanation by phenolic location.

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1
Laboratoire de Biologie et Biochimie des Lipides, Institut de Biologie, UFR de Médecine, Montpellier, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effect of the red wine phenolic compound (RWPC) dietary supplementation without alcohol interference on: (1) some of the biochemical characteristics of LDL, (2) the oxidative susceptibility of LDL and (3) the antioxidant capacity of total plasma (Pl-AOC). In order to account for discrepancies between the three series of data, the in vitro stability of the association of phenolic compounds and LDL was tested.

DESIGN:

An intervention study with 20 volunteers. Each served as his own control. Cu(2+)-oxidizability of LDL and Pl-AOC were tested on blood samples before and after dietary supplementation. Cu(2+)-oxidizability of LDL was also tested by co-incubation in the presence of RWPC or phenolic acids with or without extensive dialysis.

SETTING:

The Laboratory of Lipid Biochemistry and Biology, School of Medicine, and the Laboratory of Metabolic Diseases, Lapeyronie Hospital, University of Montpellier, France.

SUBJECTS:

Healthy males, nonsmokers and moderate drinkers, submitted to a dietary regimen deprived of vitamin E and C for a period of 10 d before supplementation. They also abstained from alcohol, wine, fruit juices, coffee, tea and cola beverages during this period.

INTERVENTION:

Six 0.33 g capsules/d (namely two capsules at each meal) of a preparation of red wine phenolic compounds in a dry powder form were given to the volunteers over a period of two weeks. Blood samples were drawn in fasting conditions at day 0 and day 14 of the supplementation period.

RESULTS:

Supplementation led to: (1) in LDL, a significant increase in vitamin E content (n = 20, P = 0.01) or vitamin E/total fatty acid bis-allylic carbon number ratio (n = 20, P = 0.006) without modification in the other biochemical characteristics or Cu(2+)-oxidizability; (2) in plasma, a significant increase in the antioxidant capacity (n = 11, P = 0.01). In vitro studies showed that RWPC or sinapic, caffeic or ferulic acids incubated in the presence of LDL increased the protection of the lipoparticle against oxidation (caffeic > sinapic > ferulic). This effect, however, was totally lost after extensive dialysis.

CONCLUSIONS:

The enhancing effect of the RWPC supplementation on Pl-AOC may be due to a phenolic-compound action both in the aqueous phase of plasma and at the surface of lipoprotein particles. Surface location possibly explains the enhancing-sparing effect of supplementation on LDL vitamin E and the absence of effect on dialysed-LDL oxidizability.

PMID:
9347289
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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