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Pediatr Nephrol. 1997 Oct;11(5):573-7.

X-linked hypophosphatemia: effects of treatment with recombinant human growth hormone.

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  • 1Ist Department of Pediatrics, Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest, Hungary.

Abstract

The impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) treatment on growth, bone mineral metabolism, and bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated in six children (3 girls, 3 boys) with familial hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH). Five were prepubertal (aged 6-8.8 years), one 15.3-year-old boy had combined XLH and GH deficiency, but had not been treated with rhGH previously. rhGH was administered daily for 1 year, at a dose of 1 IU/kg per week, combined with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and oral phosphate therapy. Z scores for growth velocity and height improved significantly (-2.9 vs. 2.5, P < 0.01, and -2.2 vs. -1.5, P < 0.01, respectively). However, the ratio of Z score for height to that of subischial leg length decreased significantly (0.65 vs. 0.43, P < 0.01), indicating disproportionate growth in favor of the trunk. The height-corrected BMD Z increased slightly (-0.99 vs. -0.94, P < 0.05). A slight increase in serum phosphate occurred (0.78 vs. 0.88 mmol/l, P < 0.02). Tubular reabsorption of phosphate/glomerular filtration rate increased from 0.45 mmol/l to 0.55 mmol at 6 months (P < 0.02), but returned to the initial level at 12 months. These results indicate that children with XLH can benefit from the positive effect of rhGH on growth, however treatment could aggravate the already existing tendency to disproportionate growth. GH production should be evaluated in poorly growing patients with XLH, because it can mask GH deficiency. rhGH can be safely combined with conventional treatment in XLH. Further studies are needed to determine the effect of treatment on final height and maximal BMD.

PMID:
9323282
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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