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Immunol Cell Biol. 1997 Aug;75(4):382-8.

DNA vaccination against virus infection and enhancement of antiviral immunity following consecutive immunization with DNA and viral vectors.

Author information

1
Division of Immunology and Cell Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Alistair.Ramsay@anu.edu.au

Abstract

Recent demonstrations of the immunogenicity of antigens encoded in DNA plasmids following delivery by various routes have heralded a new era in vaccine development. In this article, we review progress in DNA-based antiviral immunoprophylaxis. Preclinical studies have already established the immunogenicity of DNA plasmids encoding protective antigens from a wide variety of viral pathogens and work published in recent months has raised real prospects of broadly protective DNA vaccination against infections with influenza virus and HIV. We also describe a consecutive immunization protocol consisting of a priming dose of vaccine antigen encoded in DNA plasmids followed by a booster with the same antigen encoded in recombinant fowlpox virus vectors. We have used this strategy to generate protective antiviral cell-mediated immunity and sustained, high-level antibody responses both systemically and at mucosae, and to elucidate immunological mechanisms underlying the development of immunity to antigens delivered in DNA vectors.

PMID:
9315482
DOI:
10.1038/icb.1997.60
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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