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J Exp Med. 1997 Oct 6;186(7):1177-82.

Bone marrow-generated dendritic cells pulsed with tumor extracts or tumor RNA induce antitumor immunity against central nervous system tumors.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that the brain is not a barrier to successful active immunotherapy that uses gene-modified autologous tumor cell vaccines. In this study, we compared the efficacy of two types of vaccines for the treatment of tumors within the central nervous system (CNS): dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines pulsed with either tumor extract or tumor RNA, and cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccines. Using the B16/F10 murine melanoma (B16) as a model for CNS tumor, we show that vaccination with bone marrow-generated DCs, pulsed with either B16 cell extract or B16 total RNA, can induce specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes against B16 tumor cells. Both types of DC vaccines were able to protect animals from tumors located in the CNS. DC-based vaccines also led to prolonged survival in mice with tumors placed before the initiation of vaccine therapy. The DC-based vaccines were at least as effective, if not more so, as vaccines containing B16 tumor cells in which the granulocytic macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene had been modified. These data support the use of DC-based vaccines for the treatment of patients with CNS tumors.

PMID:
9314567
PMCID:
PMC2199074
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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