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J Virol. 1997 Oct;71(10):7436-41.

A human primary T-lymphocyte-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-associated kinase phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and induces CAK activity.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C. 20037, USA.

Abstract

Tat protein mediates transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which results in more-efficient transcript elongation. Since phosphorylation of C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II correlates with its enhanced processivity, we studied the properties of a Tat-associated CTD kinase derived from mitogenically stimulated human primary T lymphocytes (TTK). TTK binds to full-length Tat and specifically phosphorylates CTD and CDK2. This dual kinase activity is characteristic of CDK-activating kinase (CAK). The CTD kinase activity is induced upon mitogenic stimulation of primary T lymphocytes. Fractionation of T-cell lysate demonstrates that Tat-associated CTD kinase activity elutes in two peaks. About 60% of Tat-associated CTD kinase copurifies with CDK2 kinase activity and contains the CAK components CDK7 and cyclin H. The rest of Tat-associated kinase is free of CDK2 kinase activity and the CAK components and thus may represent a novel CTD kinase. The kinase activities of TTK are blocked by the adenosine analog 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) as well as by the kinase inhibitor H8 at concentrations known to block transcript elongation. Importantly, the Tat-associated kinase markedly induced CAK. We suggest that the mechanism of Tat-mediated processive transcription of the HIV-1 promoter includes a Tat-associated CAK activator.

PMID:
9311822
PMCID:
PMC192089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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