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Acad Med. 1997 Sep;72(9):794-7.

Refining a method of identifying CUNY Medical School graduates practicing in underserved areas.

Author information

1
City University of New York Medical School/Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education, USA. lllccc@scisun.sci.ccny.cuny.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine what percentage of graduates from the City University of New York (CUNY) Medical School/Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education practiced in underserved areas of New York State and, in the process, to develop a reliable way of collecting and verifying the information needed to carry out such an outcomes study.

METHOD:

The study group consisted of the 414 CUNY graduates who had completed their MD degrees by 1986. Addresses of graduates' practices were confirmed for 79% of the graduates, 49% of whom practiced in New York State. New York State zip codes were used as a way to identify underserved areas throughout the state.

RESULTS:

Of the 160 graduates with practices in New York State, 33% had practices in underserved areas (and 81% of these were located in New York City). In all, 26% of the whites, 73% of the African Americans, 43% of the Asian Americans, 50% of the Latinos, 34% of the women, and 32% of the men had practices in underserved areas.

CONCLUSION:

The graduates' race-ethnicity was an important factor in the likelihood of their practicing in an underserved area, whereas gender was not, a finding consistent with previous studies. Medical schools and residency programs need to institute long-term programs to track the career paths of all their graduates so that questions about the proportions of graduates in underserved areas will be relatively easy to answer.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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