Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ann Neurol. 1997 Sep;42(3):292-9.

High-frequency unilateral thalamic stimulation in the treatment of essential and parkinsonian tremor.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City 66160-7314, USA.

Abstract

Pharmacologic treatment for essential tremor and the tremor of Parkinson's disease is often inadequate. Stereotaxic surgery, such as thalamotomy, can effectively reduce tremors. We performed a multicenter trial of unilateral high-frequency stimulation of the ventral intermedius nucleus of the thalamus in 29 patients with essential tremor and 24 patients with Parkinson's disease, using a blinded assessment at 3 months after surgery to compare clinical rating of tremor with stimulation ON with stimulation OFF and baseline and a 1-year follow-up. Six patients were not implanted because of lack of intraoperative tremor suppression (2 patients), hemorrhage (2 patients), withdrawal of consent (1 patient), and persistent microthalamotomy effect (1 patient). A significant reduction in both essential and parkinsonian tremor occurred contralaterally with stimulation. Patients reported a significant reduction in disability. Measures of function were significantly improved in patients with essential tremor. Complications related to surgery in implanted patients were few. Stimulation was commonly associated with transient paresthesias. Other adverse effects were mild and well tolerated. Efficacy was not reduced at 1 year. Chronic high-frequency stimulation is safe and highly effective in ameliorating essential and parkinsonian tremor.

PMID:
9307249
DOI:
10.1002/ana.410420304
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center