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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1997 Sep;114(3):347-53.

Intentional limited resection for selected patients with T1 N0 M0 non-small-cell lung cancer: a single-institution study.

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1
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer & Cardiovascular Diseases (The Center for Adult Diseases, Osaka), Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To comparatively evaluate lobectomy and limited resection for T1 N0 M0 non-small-cell lung cancer, we reviewed case series with concurrent nonrandomized controls.

METHODS:

Limited resection with curative intent was performed for 63 patients with T1 N0 M0 non-small-cell lung cancer over a 10-year period. These 63 patients included 46 patients who underwent a segmentectomy as an intentional limited resection. These patients had good pulmonary function and could tolerate a lobectomy in the management of their disease. The other 17 patients underwent wedge resection or segmentectomy as a compromised limited resection because they had poor pulmonary reserve or other limiting factors and could withstand a thoracotomy but could not tolerate a lobectomy in the management of their disease.

RESULTS:

The 5-year survival was 93% in the intentional resection group. The survival curve for this group was not different from that for 77 patients who underwent the standard operation (lobectomy plus complete mediastinal lymph node dissection) for T1 N0 M0 non-small-cell lung cancer during the same period. The frequency of local/regional recurrence in the intentional resection group was 8.7% (4/46); the recurrence in three patients was situated in the mediastinum. According to multivariate analysis, limited resection was not associated with poor survival.

CONCLUSION:

Segmentectomy with regional lymph node dissection, including the mediastinum, should be considered as an acceptable alternative treatment for selected patients with T1 N0 M0 disease.

PMID:
9305186
DOI:
10.1016/S0022-5223(97)70179-X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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