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Exp Eye Res. 1997 Jun;64(6):971-8.

Effects of thalidomide and related metabolites in a mouse corneal model of neovascularization.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Thalidomide, when administered orally, is an inhibitor of angiogenesis in the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced rabbit cornea micropocket assay. We now show in the mouse that thalidomide given intraperitoneally but not orally significantly inhibits bFGF-induced and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced corneal neovascularization. We further demonstrate that this inhibition is independent from thalidomide's ability to suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Experiments examining thalidomide's enantiomers reveal-that the S(-)-enantiomer has the strongest antiangiogenic activity in VEGF-induced and bFGF-induced corneal neovascularization. Structure activity studies suggest that thalidomide's anti-angiogenic activity is related to the open ring metabolites resulting from hydrolysis. Together these data support a correlation between thalidomide's antiangiogenic and teratogenic activities.

PMID:
9301478
DOI:
10.1006/exer.1997.0292
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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