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Neuroscience. 1997 Nov;81(1):213-22.

Low-frequency (< 1 Hz) oscillations in the human sleep electroencephalogram.

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1
Institute of Pharmacology, University of Zürich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Low-frequency (< 1 Hz) oscillations in intracellular recordings from cortical neurons were first reported in the anaesthetized cat and then also during natural sleep. The slow sequences of hyperpolarization and depolarization were reflected by slow oscillations in the electroencephalogram. The aim of the present study was to examine whether comparable low-frequency components are present in the human sleep electroencephalogram. All-night sleep recordings from eight healthy young men were subjected to spectral analysis in which the low-frequency attenuation of the amplifier was compensated. During sleep stages with a predominance of slow waves and in the first two episodes of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep, the mean power spectrum showed a peak at 0.7-0.8 Hz (range 0.55-0.95 Hz). The typical decline in delta activity from the first to the second non-rapid-eye-movement sleep episode was not present at frequencies below 2 Hz. To detect very low frequency components in the pattern of slow waves and sleep spindles, a new time series was computed from the mean voltage of successive 0.5 s epochs of the low-pass (< 4.5 Hz) or band-pass (12-15 Hz) filtered electroencephalogram. Spectral analysis revealed a periodicity of 20-30 s in the prevalence of slow waves and a periodicity of 4 s in the occurrence of activity in the spindle frequency range. The results demonstrate that distinct components below 1 Hz are also present in the human sleep electroencephalogram spectrum. The differences in the dynamics between the component with a mean peak value at 0.7-0.8 Hz and delta waves above 2 Hz is in accordance with results from animal experiments.

PMID:
9300413
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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