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Ann Hum Biol. 1997 Sep-Oct;24(5):387-401.

The association between birthweight, sociodemographic variables and maternal anthropometry in an urban sample from Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Anthropology, University of Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

The relationship between birthweight, sociodemographic variables and maternal anthropometry was examined in a sample from an inner urban area of Dhaka, Bangladesh. About 21% of babies were of low birthweight (LBW) using the World Health Organization cut-off of < 2500 g. LBW was more common in younger (< 20 years) and older (> 30 years) mothers, the low-income group and those with little or no education. The mean birthweights of the higher-educated, higher-income group and male children were on average 290, 260 and 120 g, respectively, higher than uneducated, lower-income groups and female children. The best cut-offs for detecting LBW and normal-weight infants was maternal weight of 50 kg (odds ratio = 4.6), maternal arm circumference of 23 cm (odds ratio = 5.0) and body mass index of 20.5 (odds ratio = 6.5). The sensitivity and specificity were best for maternal weight (69% and 68%, respectively). Logistic regression analyses show that mothers' weight at term was the best single predictor of LBW (31%), while maternal weight along with age, educational level and income group correctly predicted just over 35% of LBW. Regression analyses also confirmed that mothers' weight at term was the best predictor of birthweight, with a correlation coefficient of 0.49.

PIP:

The relationship between birth weight, sociodemographic variables, and maternal anthropometry was examined in a sample of mothers and infants from an inner urban area of Dhaka, Bangladesh. 253 pregnant women aged 17-35 years, of whom 251 gave birth to live children, participated. Of the surviving children, 1 died within 7 days of birth and 2 were hospitalized after birth; these latter children were excluded from the study. 55% of babies were male, 92% were born vaginally without intervention, and 86% of the deliveries occurred at home. About 21% of babies were of low birth weight (LBW) according to the World Health Organization cut-off of less than 2500 g. LBW was more common among mothers under age 20 years and over age 30, those of low income, and those with little or no education. The mean birth weights of the higher-educated, higher-income group, and male children were 290, 260, and 120 g, respectively, higher than those of uneducated, lower-income group, and female children. The best cut-offs for detecting LBW and normal-weight infants were maternal weight of 50 kg, maternal arm circumference of 23 cm, and body mass index of 20.5. The sensitivity (69%) and specificity (68%) were best for maternal weight. Regression analyses found that mother's weight at term was the best predictor of LBW, while maternal weight combined with age, educational level, and income group correctly predicted slightly more than 35% of LBW.

PMID:
9300116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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