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Anat Rec. 1997 Sep;249(1):54-62.

Immunolocalization of androgen receptor and estrogen receptor in the developing testis and excurrent ducts of goats.

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1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Tuskegee University, AL 36088, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Because of the significance of androgens and estrogens in prenatal and postanatal differentiation of the testis and excurrent ducts, it is important to understand the developmental pattern of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor (ER) in these organs.

METHODS:

Tissues from 1-23-week-old goats were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in Paraplast-plus. Antigenic sites for AR and ER were immunolocalized using the PG-21 rabbit anti-rat/human antibody and the H-222 rat anti-human monoclonal antibody, respectively. The avidin-biotin horseradish peroxidase procedure was used to identify positive immunoreactivity. Controls included incubation of sections with irrelevant IgG in place of primary antibody.

RESULTS:

Within the testis, immunostaining for AR in the nuclei of Sertoli cells increased gradually from mild at week 1 to strong at week > or = 19. In contrast, nuclei of peritubular myoid cells and Leydig cells exhibited moderate to strong reaction for AR in all animals. Germ cells were negative. Within the rete testis, efferent ductules, regions I-V of the epididymis, and ductus deferens, nuclei of all epithelial cells, peritubular myoid cells, and intertubular connective tissue cells expressed moderate to strong staining for AR at all ages. ER were confined to nonciliated cells of the efferent ductules, which displayed moderate staining in all animals, beginning from week 1.

CONCLUSIONS:

Nuclear AR staining, found in all testicular cells (except germ cells) and excurrent duct cells examined, was observed to change in an age-related manner only in Sertoli cells, where staining intensity increased between week 1 and week 19. Staining for ER, confined to nonciliated epithelial cells of the efferent ductules, was not affected by postnatal age.

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