Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1997 Sep;36(9):1269-77.

Comparisons of problems reported by parents of children in 12 cultures: total problems, externalizing, and internalizing.

Author information

  • 1Sophia Children's Hospital, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. CRIJNEN@PSYS.AZR.NL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare parent-reported problems for children in 12 cultures.

METHOD:

Child Behavior Checklists were analyzed for 13,697 children and adolescents, aged 6 through 17 years, from general population samples in Australia, Belgium, China, Germany, Greece, Israel, Jamaica, the Netherlands, Puerto Rico, Sweden, Thailand, and the United States.

RESULTS:

Comparisons of 12 cultures across ages 6 through 11 and 9 cultures across ages 6 through 17 yielded medium effect sizes for cross-cultural variations in Total Problem, Externalizing, and Internalizing scores. Puerto Rican scores were the highest, while Swedish scores were the lowest. With great cross-cultural consistency, Total and Externalizing scores declined with age, while Internalizing scores increased; boys obtained higher Total and Externalizing scores but lower Internalizing scores than girls. Cross-cultural correlations were high among the mean item scores.

CONCLUSIONS:

Empirically based assessment provides a robust methodology for assessing and comparing problems reported for children from diverse cultures. Age and gender variations are cross-culturally consistent. Although clinical cutoff points should not necessarily be uniform across all cultures, empirically based assessment offers a cost-effective way to identify problems for which children from diverse cultural backgrounds may need help.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center