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J Periodontol. 1997 Aug;68(8):713-9.

Treatment of periodontal disease in diabetics reduces glycated hemoglobin.

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1
Periodontal Disease Research Center, Department of Oral Biology, School of Dental Medicine, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.

Abstract

Periodontal disease is a common infection-induced inflammatory disease among individuals suffering from diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of treatment of periodontal disease on the level of metabolic control of diabetes. A total of 113 Native Americans (81 females and 32 males) suffering from periodontal disease and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) were randomized into 5 treatment groups. Periodontal treatment included ultrasonic scaling and curettage combined with one of the following antimicrobial regimens: 1) topical water and systemic doxycycline, 100 mg for 2 weeks; 2) topical 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and systemic doxycycline, 100 mg for 2 weeks; 3) topical povidone-iodine and systemic doxycycline, 100 mg for 2 weeks; 4) topical 0.12% CHX and placebo; and 5) topical water and placebo (control group). Assessments were performed prior to and at 3 and 6 months after treatment and included probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque and determination of serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). After treatment all study groups showed clinical and microbial improvement. The doxycycline-treated groups showed the greatest reduction in probing depth and subgingival Porphyromonas gingivalis compared to the control group. In addition, all 3 groups receiving systemic doxycycline showed, at 3 months, significant reductions (P < or = 0.04) in mean HbA1c reaching nearly 10% from the pretreatment value. Effective treatment of periodontal infection and reduction of periodontal inflammation is associated with a reduction in level of glycated hemoglobin. Control of periodontal infections should thus be an important part of the overall management of diabetes mellitus patients.

PMID:
9287060
DOI:
10.1902/jop.1997.68.8.713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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