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Genomics. 1997 Aug 15;44(1):1-7.

Linkage of TATA-binding protein and proteasome subunit C5 genes in mice and humans reveals synteny conserved between mammals and invertebrates.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami School of Medicine, Florida 33136, USA. trachtul@biomed.cas.cz

Abstract

The TATA-binding protein (TBP) is a factor required for the transcription of all classes of eukaryotic genes. Here, we demonstrate that in the mouse the TBP-encoding gene (Tbp) resides next to the proteasomal subunit C5-encoding gene (Psmb1). The genes are located on mouse chromosome 17 in the t complex within the Hybrid sterility 1 (Hst1) region. We demonstrate that the homologous human genes (TBP AND PSMB1) are tightly linked on the long arm of chromosome 6, in a region syntenic with the proximal part of mouse chromosome 17. The mouse Tbp and Psmb1 and the human TBP and PSMB1 genes are transcribed in the opposite orientation. The TATA-binding protein and proteasomal subunit C5 genes are also linked on chromosome III of Caenorhabditis elegans, and together they are linked to other genes whose homologs map to human chromosome 6 and mouse chromosome 17. In the Drosophila genome, the housekeeping TATA-binding protein gene maps close to two other genes with homologs in the mammalian major histocompatibility complex. There thus exists conserved synteny of unrelated genes between mammals and invertebrates.

PMID:
9286694
DOI:
10.1006/geno.1997.4839
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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