Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 1997 Aug;45(1):81-95.

Transforming growth factor-beta in breast cancer: a working hypothesis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine (Medical Oncology), Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8032, USA. MichaelReiss@quickmail.yale.edu

Abstract

Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF beta) is the most potent known inhibitor of the progression of normal mammary epithelial cells through the cell cycle. During the early stages of breast cancer development, the transformed epithelial cells appear to still be sensitive to TGF beta-mediated growth arrest, and TGF beta can act as an anti-tumor promoter. In contrast, advanced breast cancers are mostly refractory to TGF beta-mediated growth inhibition and produce large amounts of TGF beta, which may enhance tumor cell invasion and metastasis by its effects on extracellular matrix. We postulate that this seemingly paradoxical switch in the responsiveness of tumor cells to TGF beta during progression is the consequence of the activation of the latent TGF beta that is produced and deposited into the tumor microenvironment, thereby driving the clonal expansion of TGF beta-resistant tumor cells. While tumor cells themselves may activate TGF beta, recent observations suggest that environmental tumor promoters or carcinogens, such as ionizing radiation, can cause stromal fibroblasts to activate TGF beta by epigenetic mechanisms. As the biological effects of the anti-estrogen tamoxifen may well be mediated by TGF beta, this model has a number of important implications for the clinical uses of tamoxifen in the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. In addition, it suggests a number of novel approaches to the treatment of advanced breast cancer.

PMID:
9285120
DOI:
10.1023/a:1005865812918
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center