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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1997 Sep;82(9):2849-55.

Serum leptin levels in normal children: relationship to age, gender, body mass index, pituitary-gonadal hormones, and pubertal stage.

Author information

1
Endocrine Division, Hospital Xeral, Vigo, Spain.

Abstract

It is commonly accepted that at least in girls puberty starts when a minimum level of body mass or a certain amount of body fat are present. However the precise signal by which adipose stores inform the hypothalamus of the degree of energetic reserves is unknown. Leptin is a hormone produced by the adipocytes to regulate food intake and energy expenditure at the hypothalamic level. To understand whether leptin is the adipose tissue signal that allows puberty, 789 normal children of both sexes, age 5-15 yr, were transversally studied. Leptin levels, as well as gonadal and gonadotropins, levels, were analyzed in addition to the determination of auxological parameters. In an age-related analysis, leptin levels in girls rose from 5-15 yr (from 4.3 +/- 0.4 to 8.5 +/- 0.9 micrograms/L) in parallel with body weight. Boys always had lower leptin levels than girls (3.3 +/- 0.3 micrograms/L at 5 yr), but they rose in parallel with weight until 10 yr (5.3 +/- 0.7 micrograms/L), when a striking decrease was observed until 15 yr (3.0 +/- 0.3 micrograms/L). In girls, leptin was the first hormone to rise followed by FSH and later by LH and estradiol. A similar pattern occurred in boys, despite the fact that leptin dropped after 10 yr when testosterone rises. Divided into three pubertal stages, i.e. P1 = prepuberty, P2 = early puberty, and P3 = overt puberty, in girls the four hormones rose progressively from P1 to P3, but from P2 to P3 the present increment was greater for LH and estradiol. In boys, leptin decreased from P1 to P3, whereas FSH, LH, and testosterone rose. The age-related changes were not caused by adiposity variations, because data did not change when subtracting values of children over 97% of standard deviation score of body mass index.

IN CONCLUSION:

1) leptin appears to increase in both boys and girls before the appearance of other reproductive hormones related to puberty; 2) leptin levels in boys are always lower than in girls, although they increase with age until the age 10 yr; 3) leptin in boys declines about the time testosterone increases. Leptin may well be a permissive factor for the initiation of pubertal events.

PMID:
9284709
DOI:
10.1210/jcem.82.9.4235
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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