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Biol Trace Elem Res. 1997 May;57(2):183-90.

Selenium and antioxidant vitamin and lipidoperoxidation levels in preaging French population. EVA Study Group. Edude de vieillissement artériel.

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1
Groupe de Recherche et d'Etude sur les Pathologies Oxydatives (GREPO), Faculté de Pharmacie, Université J. Fourier, La Tronche, France.

Abstract

Selenium (Se) and antioxidant vitamins might play an important role in the etiology of free radical-related diseases and aging. In the Edude de vieillissement artériel (EVA) study, we have determined the plasma thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) as an indicator of free radical-induced lipid peroxidation, plasma selenium and carotenoids, and erythrocyte vitamin E levels in 1389 subjects aged 59-71 years. We also looked for an association between these parameters and cardiovascular risk factors in early elderly. The results show that plasma TBARS were significantly increased in elderly in comparison with values reported in younger adults. However, plasma Se and carotenoids as well as erythrocyte vitamin E in elderly people are close to those reported in adult people. If plasma Se showed no difference between men and women, the three other parameters were significantly higher in women than in men. With regard with cardiovascular risk factors, plasma TBARS were highly positively correlated with total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in men and women. Plasma carotenoids were also positively correlated with plasma total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in both sexes. Finally, plasma TBARS were highly correlated with smoking and alcohol consumption. In conclusion, this part of the EVA study shows that some cardiovascular risk factors, like smoking and cholesterol level, are associated with high free radical-induced TBARS levels in the preaging population, although plasma Se and carotenoids as well as erythrocyte vitamin E levels in elderly people were close to those reported in adult younger people.

PMID:
9282265
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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