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J Mol Biol. 1997 Aug 22;271(3):386-404.

Large genome rearrangements discovered by the detailed analysis of 21 Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C isolates found in environment and disease habitats.

Author information

1
Klinische Forschergruppe Institut für Biophysikalische Chemie und Pädiatrische Pneumologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, OE 4350, Hannover, D-30623, Germany.

Abstract

In order to determine primary genetic events which occur during the diversification of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone in natural habitats, comparative genome analysis of 21 isolates of a predominant clone, called clone C, derived mainly from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and the aquatic environment, was carried out. Physical chromosome maps were constructed for the restriction enzymes SpeI, PacI, SwaI and I-CeuI by one and two-dimensional pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and by comparison with the existing strain C map. The positioning of 26 genes generated the genetic maps. Chromosome size varied between 6345 and 6606 kilobase-pairs (kb). A plasmid of 95 kb was detected in the strains of non-CF origin and, in addition, was found to be integrated into the chromosome of all strains but one CF isolate. Four subgroups of clone C strains were discriminated by the acquisition and loss of large blocks of DNA that could cover more than 10% of the chromosome size. The exchange of DNA blocks which ranged in size from 1 kb to 214 kb occurred preferentially around the terminus of replication region which is poor in biosynthetic genes. Genetic material which was additionally introduced into strain C in comparison with strain PAO seems to be a target of mutational processes in clone C strains. Within and among subgroups CF isolates frequently exhibited large inversions affecting the whole chromosomal structure. We concluded that the exchange of DNA blocks by mechanisms of horizontal transfer and large chromosomal inversions are major factors leading to the divergence of a clone in the species P. aeruginosa.

PMID:
9268667
DOI:
10.1006/jmbi.1997.1186
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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