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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1997 Aug;82(8):2542-7.

Glucocorticoid regulation of leptin synthesis and secretion in humans: elevated plasma leptin levels in Cushing's syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan.

Abstract

Leptin, the obese (ob) gene product, is an adipocyte-derived satiety factor that is involved in the regulation of food ingestion and body weight. To investigate glucocorticoid regulation of leptin synthesis and secretion in humans, we measured plasma leptin levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome with adrenal or pituitary adenoma and in patients with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome. Plasma leptin levels in patients with Cushing's syndrome were significantly elevated compared to those in nonobese healthy subjects and obese subjects without any metabolic or endocrine diseases at a given percentage of body fat by analysis of covariance. In patients with adrenal or pituitary adenoma, after the tumor resection, plasma leptin levels were reduced, with a concurrent decrease in plasma cortisol levels. With no significant changes in body weight, plasma leptin levels were also elevated significantly in lean healthy volunteers 24 h after the administration of 1 mg dexamethasone. Dexamethasone potently induced ob gene expression and leptin secretion in the organ culture of human adipose tissue. The data demonstrate that glucocorticoids act, at least in part, directly on the adipose tissue and increase leptin synthesis and secretion in humans.

PMID:
9253331
DOI:
10.1210/jcem.82.8.4128
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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