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Biometals. 1997 Jul;10(3):185-91.

Uptake of 26-Al and 67-Ga into brain and other tissues of normal and hypotransferrinaemic mice.

Author information

1
Physiology Group, King's College, London, UK. a.radunovic@iop.bpmf.ac.uk

Abstract

Aluminium uptake from blood into tissues of control and homozygous hypotransferrinaemic (hpx/hpx) mice, following continuous intravenous infusion of 26Al and 67Ga, has been compared with that of gallium, a proposed tracer for aluminium. 26Al uptake into tissues of control (hpx/+ and +/+) mice occurred in the order (expressed as a space): bone 464.7 ml 100 g-1; renal cortex 102.9 ml 100 g-1; liver 13.0 ml 100 g-1; spleen 8.4 ml 100 g-1 and brain 0.8 ml 100 g-1. 67Ga uptakes were similar in liver, spleen and brain, but smaller in the renal cortex and bone, at one-third and one-fifth of the values for 26Al, respectively. In the hypotransferrinaemic mice, uptake of 67Ga into all tissues was increased, especially in renal cortex (ninefold) and bone (twentyfold) as compared with the controls. Increases in 67Ga uptakes into cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and brain stem of the hypotransferrinaemic mice were 3.8, 4.2 and 2.8 fold, respectively. 26Al uptake into tissues of the hypotransferrinaemic mice was similar to control values except in bone where it was three times greater. Pre-treatment of control animals with the anti-transferrin receptor antibody, RI7 208, enhanced 67Ga uptake in all tissues, the effect being greatest in renal cortex (tenfold) and bone (ninefold). 67Ga uptakes into cerebral hemisphere, cerebellum and brain stem in the mice pre-treated with RI7 208 were 6.4, 6 and 10 times greater than in untreated mice, respectively. No influence of antibody on 26AI uptake into mouse tissues was observed except in spleen where it was three times greater than in untreated mice. Hence, transport of aluminium and gallium into mouse tissues is not similar under all conditions. Non-transferrin mediated transport of each metal can occur into all tissues, especially in renal cortex and bone, where gallium may be a suitable marker for aluminium.

PMID:
9243797
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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