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Lancet. 1997 Jul 26;350(9073):245-50.

HIV-1 disease progression and AIDS-defining disorders in rural Uganda.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council Programme on AIDS, Uganda Virus Research Institute, Entebbe, Uganda.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The majority of people infected with HIV-1 live in Africa, yet little is known about the natural history of the disease in that continent. We studied survival times, disease progression, and AIDS-defining disorders, according to the proposed WHO staging system, in a population-based, rural cohort in Uganda.

METHODS:

In 1990 we recruited a random sample of people already infected with HIV-1 (as prevalent cases) detected during the initial survey round of a general-population study to form a natural-history cohort. Individuals from the general-population cohort who seroconverted between 1990 and 1995 (incident cases) were also invited to enroll. Participants were seen routinely every 3 months and when they were III.

FINDINGS:

By the end of 1995, 93 prevalent cases and 86 incident cases had been enrolled. Four patients in the prevalent group were in stage 4 (AIDS) at the initial visit. During the next 5 years, 37 prevalent cases progressed to AIDS. Seven incident cases progressed to AIDS and the cumulative progression to AIDS at 1, 3, and 5 years after seroconversion was 2%, 6%, and 22%, respectively. The cumulative probability of AIDS at 4 years from entering stages 1, 2, and 3 was 11%, 33%, and 58%, respectively. There were 47 deaths among prevalent cases and seven among incident cases during follow-up. The cumulative mortality 4 years after patients entered stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 9%, 33%, 56%, and 86%, respectively. The median survival after the onset of AIDS was 9.3 months.

INTERPRETATION:

Our results are important for the setting of priorities and rationalisation of treatment availability in countries with poor resources. We found that progression rates to AIDS are similar to those in developed countries for homosexual cohorts and greater than for cohorts infected by other modes of transmission. However, we have found that the rates of all-cause mortality are much higher and the progression times to death are shorter than in developed countries.

PIP:

The authors studied AIDS-defining disorders, disease progression, and survival times in cohorts of HIV-infected people in a rural region of Uganda. A random sample of people already infected with HIV-1 was recruited in 1990. The subjects had been detected during the initial survey round of a general-population study to form a natural-history cohort. Individuals from the general-population cohort who seroconverted between 1990 and 1995 were also invited to enroll in the study. Participants were seen routinely every 3 months and when they were ill. By the end of 1995, 93 prevalent cases and 86 incident cases had been enrolled. Four patients in the prevalent group were in World Health Organization-defined stage 4 HIV disease, AIDS, at the initial visit. Over the next 5 years, 37 prevalent cases progressed to AIDS. Seven incident cases progressed to AIDS and the cumulative progression to AIDS at 1, 3, and 5 years after seroconversion was 2%, 6%, and 22%, respectively. The cumulative probability of AIDS at 4 years from entering stages 1, 2, and 3 was 11%, 33%, and 58%, respectively. There were 47 deaths among prevalent cases and seven among incident cases during follow-up. The cumulative mortality 4 years after patients entered stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 9%, 33%, 56%, and 86%, respectively. The median survival duration after the onset of AIDS was 9.3 months.

PMID:
9242801
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(97)01474-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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