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Am J Public Health. 1997 Jun;87(6):1003-7.

The effect of high altitude and other risk factors on birthweight: independent or interactive effects?

Author information

1
Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Denver, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined whether the decline in birth-weight with increasing altitude is due to an independent effect of altitude or an exacerbation of other risk factors.

METHODS:

Maternal, paternal, and infant characteristics were obtained from 3836 Colorado birth certificates from 1989 through 1991. Average altitude of residence for each county was determined.

RESULTS:

None of the characteristics related to birthweight (gestational age, maternal weight gain, parity, smoking, prenatal care visits, hypertension, previous small-for-gestational-age infant, female newborn) interacted with the effect of altitude. Birthweight declined an average of 102 g per 3300 ft (1000 m) elevation when the other characteristics were taken into account, increasing the percentage of low birthweight by 54% from the lowest to the highest elevations in Colorado.

CONCLUSIONS:

High altitude acts independently from other factors to reduce birthweight and accounts for Colorado's high rate of low birthweight.

PMID:
9224184
PMCID:
PMC1380938
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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