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Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1997 Jun;21(6):417-23.

Hyperviscosity and microproteinuria in central obesity: relevance to cardiovascular risk.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pavia, Ospedale S. Margherita, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the role of blood rheology changes in the occurrence of glomerular proteinuria in obese patients with central fat distribution.

SUBJECTS:

Fifty-nine obese out-patients (31 with central and 28 with peripheral body fat distribution) and 24 healthy subjects.

MEASUREMENTS:

Blood and plasma viscosity (Rotational viscometer CV100 HAAKE), erythrocyte deformability (whole-blood filtration time), fibrinogen (nephelometry), urinary excretion rates of albumin, IgG, transferrin and IgA (nephelometry).

RESULTS:

Higher blood viscosity (at low and high shear-rates), plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, erythrocyte aggregability and lower erythrocyte deformability were found in patients with central obesity than in patients with peripheral obesity (P < 0.01) and in healthy subjects (P < 0.001). Furthermore an increased urinary excretion rate of albumin (P < 0.001), IgG (P < 0.001), transferrin (P < 0.01) and IgA (P < 0.05) was found in patients with central obesity than in the other two groups. Blood hyperviscosity (at shear-rate 1 s-1 and 1/200 ratio) significantly correlated with the amount of urinary excretion of proteins independently of the other clinical and metabolic variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data demonstrated haemorheologic disorders related to pathologic proteinuria in patients with central obesity. The interaction between these two components may increase the risk of widespread cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
9192223
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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