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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1997 May;176(5):1017-25.

Bone mineral changes in young women with hypothalamic amenorrhea treated with oral contraceptives, medroxyprogesterone, or placebo over 12 months.

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1
General Clinical Research Center, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objectives of this study were to assess (1) whether treatment with oral contraceptives, in comparison with medroxyprogesterone and placebo, improved bone mineral in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and (2) whether treatment with medroxyprogesterone, in comparison with placebo, improved bone mineral in women with hypothalamic oligomenorrhea.

STUDY DESIGN:

The study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Twenty-four white women, aged 14 to 28 years, with hypothalamic amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea were prospectively enrolled for a 12-month intervention period. Amenorrheic subjects were randomized to receive oral contraceptives, medroxyprogesterone, or placebo. Oligomenorrheic subjects were randomized to receive medroxyprogesterone or placebo. Bone mineral was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline and at 6 and 12 months.

RESULTS:

In amenorrheic subjects spine and total body bone mineral measurements at 12 months were greater in the oral contraceptive group than in the medroxyprogesterone and placebo groups when baseline bone mineral measurements, body weight, and age were controlled for (p < or = 0.05). There were no differences in hip bone mineral calcium and bone mineral density measurements at 12 months among the three groups. In oligomenorrheic subjects there was no detectable improvement in bone mineral associated with medroxyprogesterone use.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study supports the hypothesis that oral contraceptive use in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea will improve lumbar spine and total body bone mineral.

PIP:

The objectives of this study were to assess 1) whether treatment with oral contraceptives (OCs), in comparison with medroxyprogesterone and placebo, improved bone mineral content and density in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea and 2) whether treatment with medroxyprogesterone, in comparison with placebo, improved bone mineral content and density in women with hypothalamic oligomenorrhea. The study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial. 24 White women, aged 14-28 years, with hypothalamic amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea were prospectively enrolled for a 12-month intervention period. Amenorrheic subjects were randomized to receive OCs, medroxyprogesterone, or placebo. Oligomenorrheic subjects were randomized to receive medroxyprogesterone or placebo. Bone mineral content and density were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at baseline and at 6 and 12 months. In amenorrheic subjects spine and total body bone mineral measurements at 12 months were greater in the OC group than in the medroxyprogesterone and placebo groups when baseline bone mineral measurements, body weight, and age were controlled for (p or= 0.05). There were no differences in hip bone mineral calcium and bone mineral density measurements at 12 months among the three groups. In oligomenorrheic subjects there was no detectable improvement in bone mineral content and density associated with medroxyprogesterone use. This study supports the hypothesis that OC use in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea will improve lumbar spine and total body bone mineral content and density.

PMID:
9166162
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9378(97)70396-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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