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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1997 May;99(5):613-7.

Sensitization to hen's egg at the age of twelve months is predictive for allergic sensitization to common indoor and outdoor allergens at the age of three years.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Specific predictors for atopic sensitization in early infancy are prerequisites for preventive intervention studies.

OBJECTIVE:

To identify predictors of allergic sensitization to common aeroallergens in infancy, 1314 children in five German cities were followed up from birth (1990) to the age of 3 years.

METHODS:

Blood samples were taken from cord blood and at follow-up visits at the ages of 1, 2, and 3 years. Total serum IgE and specific IgE antibodies to common food and inhalant allergens were determined.

RESULTS:

Among our study population, risk factors for sensitization to indoor and/or outdoor allergens at the age of 3 years were a positive family history, the presence of hen's egg-specific IgE antibodies (> or = 0.35 kU/L), and increased log- [total IgE] levels at the age of 12 months. Elevated cord blood IgE was not associated with sensitization to inhalant allergens at the age of 3 years. Egg-specific IgE greater than 2 kU/L in combination with a positive family history of atopy was a highly specific (specificity, 99%) and predictive (positive predictive value, 78%) marker for sensitization to inhalant allergens at 3 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hen's egg-specific IgE at the age of 12 months is a valuable marker for subsequent allergic sensitization to allergens that cause asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis.

PMID:
9155826
DOI:
10.1016/s0091-6749(97)70021-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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