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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 May;16(5):504-7.

Association of torovirus with acute and persistent diarrhea in children.

Author information

1
Research Laboratory for Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. marion.koopmans@rivm.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the etiologic role of toroviruses as a cause of gastroenteritis in humans.

METHODS:

The design was a case-control study. We compared the rate of torovirus detection in fecal specimens from a selection of children with acute or persistent diarrhea and controls without diarrhea from a study of childhood diarrhea in an urban Brazilian slum. Stool samples were coded and tested in a blinded fashion for the presence of torovirus antigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, other enteropathogens, toxins and fecal leukocytes.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three children with acute diarrhea, 41 children with persistent diarrhea and 17 controls were enlisted in the study. Torovirus antigen was detected in 9 (27%) samples from children with acute diarrhea, 11 (27%) samples from children with persistent diarrhea and none of the samples from controls (P < 0.05). In addition the presence of enteroaggregative E. coli was associated with persistent diarrhea and the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts was common although not significant (P = 0.08); torovirus and Cryptosporidium occurred in different subsets of samples, whereas torovirus and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli were commonly found in combination.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data indicate that toroviruses, alone or in combination with enteroaggregative E. coli, may play a pathogenic role in acute and possibly persistent diarrhea. Further studies are warranted to determine the etiologic role of toroviruses in gastroenteritis.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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