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Psychol Med. 1997 May;27(3):731-6.

Predictors of treatment outcome for major depression in primary care.

Author information

1
University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A randomized controlled clinical trial compared three treatments for major depression in primary care. Ninety-one patients were randomized to receive either problem-solving, or amitriptyline with standard clinical management, or drug placebo with standard clinical management. This paper examines the possible predictive value of a range of demographic clinical and personality variables in determining outcome.

METHODS:

To examine the interaction between treatment group and predictor variables, analyses of co-variants were carried out for two outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Beck Depression Inventory. Predictor variables were also entered into a stepwise forward logistic regression in which patients were categorized as recovered or not recovered.

RESULTS:

None of the predictor variables examined interacted with treatment to predict outcome. Patients with a longer duration of illness, chronic social difficulties, or definite, as opposed to probable, major depression had a poorer outcome at the end of treatment, irrespective of treatment group.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings in this study do not enable clear guidelines to be given as to which patients with major depression in primary care might benefit from either a psychological or pharmacological treatment.

PMID:
9153693
DOI:
10.1017/s0033291796004126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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