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Arthroscopy. 1997 Apr;13(2):188-200.

Arthroscopic extra-articular Bankart repair for the treatment of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation.

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1
General Hospital of Salzburg, Austria.

Abstract

This study describes a new arthroscopic procedure for the stabilization of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocations. The technique involves two important features. The first is the anterior inferior transmuscular approach through the subscapularis muscle, which permits self-locking implants to be inserted into the anterior inferior third of the glenoid rim so that they oppose the direction of pull of the capsule. This approach was studied on 79 cadaveric shoulders before clinical application. The second feature is the extracapsular (extra-articular) location of the self-locking implants, which permits a superomedial capsular shift as required. The technique offers a high degree of capsular stability. Of a total of 318 patients undergoing this procedure, the first 100 shoulders (98 patients) were evaluated postoperatively at an average of 35 months (range, 18 to 62 months). The diagnosis in all cases was traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Repair of the capsule was performed initially with screws and later with absorbable tacks. The overall recurrence rate was 9% (9 shoulders). Excluding the first 30 shoulders to take account of the learning curve, the recurrence rate for the subsequent 70 shoulders was only 5.7%. Limitation of external rotation at 0 degrees abduction averaged 6.7 degrees and 6.1 degrees at 90 degrees abduction for all shoulders; 61% of participants in overhead sports and 70% of participants in contact sports resumed their preinjury activities. The recurrence rate for patients involved in overhead sports was 10% and for collision sports it was 14%. There were no recurrences in the case of patients whose sports involve minimum risk to the shoulder (cycling, jogging). Most recurrences were observed in patients with lax shoulders and small Bankart lesions.

PMID:
9127077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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