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Acta Derm Venereol. 1997 Mar;77(2):154-6.

A controlled trial of acupuncture in psoriasis: no convincing effect.

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1
Department of Dermatology, Linköping University, Sweden.

Abstract

Several uncontrolled studies have suggested that acupuncture is an effective treatment for psoriasis. To test this hypothesis, 56 patients suffering from long-standing plaque psoriasis were randomized to receive either active treatment (electrostimulation by needles placed intramuscularly, plus ear-acupuncture) or placebo (sham, 'minimal acupuncture') twice weekly for 10 weeks. The severity of the skin lesions was scored (PASI) before, during, and 3 months after therapy. After 10 weeks of treatment the PASI mean value had decreased from 9.6 to 8.3 in the 'active' group and from 9.2 to 6.9 in the placebo group (p < 0.05 for both groups). These effects are less than the usual placebo effect of about 30%. There were no statistically significant differences between the outcomes in the two groups during or 3 months after therapy. The patient's own opinion about the results showed no preference for 'active' therapy. It was also clear from the answers that the blinded nature of the study had not been discovered by the patients. In conclusion, classical acupuncture is not superior to sham (placebo) 'minimal acupuncture' in the treatment of psoriasis.

PMID:
9111831
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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