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Ophthalmic Surg Lasers. 1997 Apr;28(4):305-10.

Diode laser-pumped, frequency-doubled neodymium: YAG laser peripheral iridotomy.

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1
Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

The solid-state, continuous-wave, frequency-doubled neodymium: yttrrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser pumped by a diode laser has several advantages, including air cooling, higher electrical to optical efficiency ratios, portability, and the use of standard 110-V AC electrical service. The authors wanted to evaluate the use of the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser for peripheral iridotomy and to compare the tissue interactions of this laser with those of the argon laser.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The authors developed a diode laser-pumped, solid-state, and portable frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a wavelength of 532 nm. The effects of peripheral iridotomy with the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and the argon laser were evaluated in pig eyes in vitro and in rabbit eyes in vivo. Specimens were prepared for light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

RESULTS:

The frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser successfully created patent iridotomies in all animal eyes treated. The following parameters were used to create penetrating burns: duration of 0.1 second, spot size of 100 microns, and power of 500 mW. In rabbit eyes, the mean number of pulses (P = .16) and the total energy required (P = .21) for iridotomy were not significantly different for the argon laser compared with the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. Gross and histologic evaluation showed similar thermal effects in iris tissues for both the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and the argon laser. The mean zone of thermal damage was 178 +/- 19 microns for the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and 163 +/- 24 microns for the argon laser (P = .14). Scanning electron microscopy showed less disruption of the surface of the lesion for the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser compared with the argon laser.

CONCLUSIONS:

Successful peripheral iridotomy can be performed with the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. Coagulative effects with the frequency-doubled Nd:YAG were similar to those with the argon laser, and the thermal damage zones were comparable in size.

PMID:
9101569
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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